Google against annoying pop ups

From January 10th 2017 Google will penalize
Google against annoying pop-ups

Google against annoying pop ups

Google against annoying pop-ups

Google has become in the All seeing eye, it has forced for better or worse, to follow the internet protocol within the world of web pages. Nowadays if you don´t appear in their search results you are lost, not only that, if you don´t appear in the first 3 pages of the results seems like you don´t even exist.

Google against annoying pop-ups

Google penalizes the use of pop-up and interstitial ads that cover all or partially the content of the web on mobile devices.

And as everyone wants to be found and be seen, this means that you dance to the rhythm that Google play for you or you lose.

On 2014, Google added a mobile-friendly label to help users to find pages where the text and content was readable without zooming and the tap targets were appropriately spaced. Since then, it’s been seen the ecosystem evolve and we recently found that 85% of all pages in the mobile search results now meet this criteria and show the mobile-friendly label.

Annoying advertisement

Pages that show intrusive interstitials provide a poorer experience to users than other pages where content is immediately accessible. This can be problematic on mobile devices where screens are often smaller. To improve the mobile search experience, after January 10, 2017, pages where content is not easily accessible to a user on the transition from the mobile search results may not rank as highly.

Algunas excepciones

Google against annoying pop-ups

Google will not penalize in case to notice about cookies, age of majority or small adds that allow you to view the content of the web.

By contrast, here are some examples of techniques that, used responsibly, would not be affected by the new signal: Interstitials that appear to be in response to a legal obligation, such as for cookie usage or for age verification. Login dialogs on sites where content is not publicly indexable. For example, this would include private content such as email or unindexable content that is behind a paywall. Banners that use a reasonable amount of screen space and are easily dismissible. For example, the app install banners provided by Safari and Chrome are examples of banners that use a reasonable amount of screen space.
Is a change for which we are thankful as users, but also arise doubts as what happens with the network’s display of Google? or what happens with the remarketing of Google Adwords? whose banners and advertising also could result in a negative experience to the user if the campaigns are poorly configured.